Sometimes, historians have their uses …

Today is the anniversary of one of the most appalling floods in Tenerife’s history … the 192nd anniversary! We know about it thanks to the research of lecturer and member of the Canarian Meteorological Association, José Luis Hernández, who discovered how the deluge was the result of a storm in 1826 which caused between 500 and 1000 deaths and destroyed some 400 dwellings. The majority of those affected were in the La Orotava area, but the wider north Tenerife region suffered too, with the torrential downpour, lasting for 11 consecutive hours, being so strong that 12 new barrancos were created.

The La Orotava valley itself was destroyed, with cultivated land devastated, and bridges and roads washed away as though they’d never existed. The lower part of the valley was filled with sand, mud, rocks, the pulped remains of whatever infrastructure and dwellings had been carried along by the downpour, and even the bodies of people and animals which had been swept down with the waters. Even the bay was filled up with rubble so that boats were wrecked, and the area was so silted up that the sea was pushed 208 metres further out than it had been previously.

La Orotava Culture councillor Francisco Linares has said that the research is vitally important because it has recorded an historic event “unknown by the vast majority of the public”, but which created a grave humanitarian, social and economic crisis. José Luis Hernández himself said that one cannot know precisely what the weather system was that caused the catastrophe but it was probably a tropical cyclone whose effects were worsened by the considerable deforestation that took place in Tenerife’s mountains in the 19th century. Referring to 2005’s storm Delta, he explained that on that occasion we had the great good fortune that the two fronts of rain and wind were separated. “God forbid that it should be repeated without such good luck”, he said, because the effects now are incalculable, particularly with the way in which building has taken place in barrancos.

 

source https://www.janetanscombe.com/news/historian-brings-to-light-tenerifes-great-storm-of-1826.html

A Breif History of the Santa Cruz Carnival Music

A Breif History of the Santa Cruz Carnival Music

Tenerife’s carnival dates back hundreds of years to the island’s earliest European settlement in the late 15th century.  The Carnival of Santa Cruz is the second most popular of its kind in the world after the Rio de Janeiro carnival in Brazil. The Spanish conquest in...

The Languages of Tenerife

The Languages of Tenerife

The native language is Spanish. In the south English is spoken by everyone with German and Italian common too, but in the north, fluent English is spoken by fewer people. No big problem should be anticipated regarding communication, though. A good tip is to pronounce...

The Beautiful Garachico

The Beautiful Garachico

If you’re looking for something off the tourist trail, head to to the Anaga Mountains in the north east of the island. Formed by a volcanic eruption 7-9 million years ago, this prehistoric mountain range is the oldest part of the island, and a trip here feels like...

The Awe-inspiring Punta de Teno,

The Awe-inspiring Punta de Teno,

This rugged, rocky headland ten kilometers from Buenavista is the most westerly point on the island and a great place to get away from the crowds and blow away the cobwebs with a bit of bracing sea air. Admire the active lighthouse perched precipitously on the rocks,...

Advertisements

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This