Las Burras de Güímar – a Witches’ Sabbath in Güímar

Las Burras de Güímar – a Witches’ Sabbath in Güímar

 

Photos: Association Las Burras de Güímar.

The Carnaval season is already underway with the musical group competitions taking place in Santa Cruz, but one particularly evocative event in the whole Carnaval season takes place in Güímar, where a modern twist on the old local legend of Las Burras de Güímar is enacted, the witches who disguised themselves as donkey mares (burras) to infiltrate the public to carry out acts of black magic in honour of their Lord, the Devil himself.

This year’s performance is on Saturday 7 March. The whole thing begins around 9pm with a typical religious motif but soon becomes something far more pagan, bestial, and mystical, as the parade leaves the plaza de San Pedro Arriba and gradually turns into a Witches’ Sabbath! If you want to see something really quite different, this is the place to be!

The full website for the Santa Cruz carnival, which takes place between 19 February and 10 March, is HERE, containing the full programme HERE and the daily calendar HERE. Other big carnivals in Tenerife are Puerto de la Cruz (7 Feb-1 Mar), Los Cristianos (12-23 Mar), and Los Gigantes (6-14 March).

A Spanglish Christmas Poem

A Spanglish Christmas Poem

It’s not quite time yet but I’ve just come across this from Anne Hernandez of Brexpats in Spain and think it is brilliant! I hope you will think so too.

A Spanglish Christmas Poem

‘Twas the night before Christmas and all through the casa, (house)
Not a creature was stirring : ¡Caramba! ¿Qué pasa? (Good heavens. What’s wrong?)
Los niños (the children) were tucked away in their camas, (beds)
Some in long underwear, some in pijamas.

While hanging the stockings con mucho cuidado (very carefully)
In hopes that old Santa would feel obligado (bound/obliged)
To bring all children, both buenos and malos, (good and bad)
A nice batch of dulces (sweet things) and other regalos. (presents)

Outside in the yard there arose such a grito (shout)
That I jumped to my feet like a fightened cabrito. (little goat)
I ran to the window and looked out afuera, (outside)
And who in the world do you think that it era? (was)

Saint Nick in a sleigh and a big red sombrero (hat)
Came dashing along like a crazy bombero. (fireman)
And pulling his sleigh instead of venados (reindeer)
Were eight little burros (donkeys) approaching volados. (flying)

I watched as they came and this quaint little hombre (man)
Was shouting and whistling and calling by nombre: (name)
“Ay Pancho, ay Pepe, ay Cuco, ay Beto,
Ay Chato, ay Chopo, Macuco, y Nieto!”

Then standing erect with his hands on his pecho (chest)
He flew to the top of our very own techo. (roof)
With his round little belly like a bowl of jalea, (jelly)
He struggled to squeeze down our old chiminea, (chimney)
Then huffing and puffing at last in our sala, (room)
With soot smeared all over his red suit de gala, (fancy suit)

He filled all the stockings with lovely regalos (presents)
For none of the ninos had been very malos. (bad/naughty)
Then chuckling aloud, seeming very contento, (happy)
He turned like a flash and was gone like the viento. (wind)
And I heard him exclaim, and this is verdad, (true)
Merry Christmas to all, and Feliz Navidad! (Merry Christmas!)